CCFA Intern Update – May 2023

CCFA Intern Update – May 2023

CCFA Intern Update – May 2023

Our two 2023 Greening Young Futures interns have been busy with their six-month placements since the beginning of April at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. We caught up recently with Akona Ngalo and Vuyisanani “Tshatshu” Busakwe to find out how their internships are going…

Have you enjoyed your internship at Nyosi so far?

Akona: I have enjoyed it!

Tshatshu: Very much enjoyed the experience. The team spirit and morale are great at Nyosi. All employees are keen to help and teach me things and go out of their way to facilitate this.

What are the various aspects that you’ve been involved in and learning about?

Akona: I have been involved in many hospitality aspects such as the wine & gin tasting – Antonio has been helping and guiding me, and I have found it very interesting and enjoyable. Busi has been showing me how to be a Barista and Anele has started to introduce me to the booking system. I have also had the opportunity to interact with Indalo and learn about plans and projects they are doing. I was also given the opportunity to host an event in the Villa and attend to all the guests for a day meeting.

Tshatshu: Kitchen – cooking and baking with DJ. Blackie is teaching me about plants and even lent me a nature guidebook which I found super interesting and made me start to research FGASA however the tuition fees are very expensive.

What is the highlight from your first month of internship?

Akona: Game drives with field guide Abi. Abi teaches me about the landscape and animals.

Tshatshu: I would like to answer Q3&4 together.

What are you looking forward to the most as part of your internship?

Akona: Learning more especially nature and how to conserve nature and keep it going.

Tshatshu: At Nyosi the staff take excellent care of the maintenance and are extremely hardworking. This continues to inspire me and is highlighted daily. Thus, makes every day a highlight and I look forward to all the learning which is still to come.

Are you excited to start working together with Indalo on the Greening the Community follow-ups at the schools in KwaNobuhle?

Akona: YES! If we involve young minds, we can preserve nature for the next generation.

Tshatshu: VERY! I know a lot of schools and teachers where we will be doing our follow-ups. I am grateful to give back to the community and to do something special for the community to show them to get involved in good things. (He expressed often that he loves working at Nyosi and then going home to soccer training. He is actively trying to be involved in wholesome work and after-work activities. Many of these peers and younger have resorted to drugs and crime).

What message would you want to share with the pupils at the KwaNobuhle schools?

Akona: School is NB we need to take care of nature. We are also nature therefore going green is the way forward.

Tshatshu: Try to be positive, and don’t allow peers to pressure you. Be active i.e., play sports and get involved in good community activities i.e., talent show.

Have you had people from your community asking questions about your internship experience so far? If so, what are they interested to know?

Akona:  Friends, family and fellow churchgoers have expressed – interest in coming to experience Nyosi to see what is happening here.

Tshatshu:  Currently I only see my friends on weekends as my daily routine does not allow for seeing friends – I come to work and go back to soccer practice followed by home. However, I have often updated my WhatsApp status or on weekends friends have been asking about my experience.

Has your internship experience so far impacted your career ambitions?

Akona: Originally, I wanted to be a teacher as I am good at teaching people things. Since being in a hospitality space I learnt more and realized how much work there is to be done in this industry. Being a Game ranger is something I am also interested in.

Tshatshu: I would love to have a career where I can maintain a balance of work and sport. My ideal would be to work and still be able to play soccer after work. Careers which have started to interest me are guiding, veterinary, nursing, and social work.

What is your favourite wild animal and why?

Akona: Elephant – as it is big and strong (like me!)

Tshatshu:  Giraffes – their patterns are amazing.

We are looking forward to following the rest of Akona and Tshatshu’s internship journeys, as they continue to be exposed to various aspects of ecotourism, hospitality, conservation, community projects and more!

Additional information:

How to support our projects

Related Posts

CCFA Intern Update – May 2023

CCFA Intern Update – May 2023

CCFA Intern Update - May 2023Our two 2023 Greening Young Futures interns have been busy with their six-month placements since the beginning of April at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. We caught up recently with Akona Ngalo and Vuyisanani “Tshatshu” Busakwe to find out how...

read more
Celebrating Biodiversity in the Urban Jungle

Celebrating Biodiversity in the Urban Jungle

International Day for Biological Diversity 2023The International Day for Biological Diversity (Biodiversity) is celebrated on 22 May each year to increase understanding and awareness of biodiversity issues. The theme for 2023 is “From Agreement to Action: Build Back...

read more
CCFA announces new ambassador

CCFA announces new ambassador

Introducing Dr Dean Allen The Community Conservation Fund Africa (CCFA) is pleased to announce that Dr Dean Allen has accepted the role of ambassador for our organization. Originally from England, Dean has made South Africa and more specifically the Eastern Cape his...

read more

Celebrating Biodiversity in the Urban Jungle

Celebrating Biodiversity in the Urban Jungle

International Day for Biological Diversity 2023

The International Day for Biological Diversity (Biodiversity) is celebrated on 22 May each year to increase understanding and awareness of biodiversity issues. The theme for 2023 is “From Agreement to Action: Build Back Biodiversity”. We are happy to share how we are building back biodiversity in a peri-urban area through active rewilding of land, wildlife species and people’s hearts through our legacy project at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve.

What is Biodiversity?

Biodiversity refers to the variety of life on Earth. It encompasses the diversity of living organisms, their genetic variability and the communities and ecosystems they form. Biodiversity is a measure of the richness and abundance of life at different levels of organization, from genes to ecosystems, and it includes the interactions between different organisms and their physical environment.

Biodiversity and the Web of Life

As UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme) states, nature is humanity’s lifeline. The web of life is a metaphorical representation of how all living things are interconnected, with each species playing a vital role in maintaining the balance and functionality of ecosystems. Healthy biodiversity is the foundation of the web of life upon which all species, including humans, depend. Each time we lose a species, we also lose its connections and relationships to other species and ecosystems, effectively creating a gaping hole in the web of life and weakening it.

Space for Species

We believe that preserving biodiversity and empowering communities in urban and peri-urban areas forms an important part of the future of conservation, especially as space continues to become more challenging for wildlife and for people. We see peri-urban reserves as an opportunity to connect even more people with nature, creating conservation ambassadors within communities.

Despite the common perception that cities are mostly devoid of nature, urban areas can support a surprising amount of biodiversity, from insects and birds to small mammals and reptiles and amphibians. Spaces like parks, green spaces and even rooftops can support biodiversity, and in the case of our legacy project at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve, urban nature reserves.

Situated within the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan, Nyosi Wildlife Reserve is sandwiched between the two cities of Kariega (Uitenhage) and Gqeberha (Port Elizabeth), representing a very special pocket of biodiversity with four unique vegetation types.

Why is urban biodiversity important?

  • It provides opportunities for urban residents to connect with nature and experience its benefits, such as stress reduction, improved mental health, and enhanced well-being.
  • It contributes to the functioning of urban ecosystems and provides a range of ecosystem services, such as pollination, pest control, and carbon storage.
  • It can help support the survival of some species that have been negatively affected by habitat loss and fragmentation in other areas. An example is the cheetah, Africa’s most threatened big cat. Our Cheetah Rewilding Project supports the cheetah metapopulation aimed at preserving this iconic species.

Can urban nature reserves really make a difference?

Yes! Urban nature reserves serve as wildlife corridors and green connections which are important for maintaining and enhancing biodiversity. These are strips of habitat that connect different green spaces within or outside the city, allowing wildlife to move and disperse between them. Wildlife corridors and green connections help to counteract the fragmentation and isolation of urban habitats, allowing species to access food, mates, and other resources.
The creation of wildlife corridors and green connections is particularly important for species that have large home ranges or are highly mobile, such as birds, bats, and some mammals.

Connecting People and Nature

Nature reserves in urban areas can also provide opportunities for research, education, and community engagement. They can be used as living laboratories for studying urban ecology and can provide opportunities for citizen science and community engagement in biodiversity conservation efforts. By involving urban residents in nature reserve management and conservation efforts, nature reserves can also help to promote awareness and appreciation of biodiversity and its importance for human wellbeing.

Additional information:

How to support our projects

Related Posts

CCFA Intern Update – May 2023

CCFA Intern Update – May 2023

CCFA Intern Update - May 2023Our two 2023 Greening Young Futures interns have been busy with their six-month placements since the beginning of April at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. We caught up recently with Akona Ngalo and Vuyisanani “Tshatshu” Busakwe to find out how...

read more
Celebrating Biodiversity in the Urban Jungle

Celebrating Biodiversity in the Urban Jungle

International Day for Biological Diversity 2023The International Day for Biological Diversity (Biodiversity) is celebrated on 22 May each year to increase understanding and awareness of biodiversity issues. The theme for 2023 is “From Agreement to Action: Build Back...

read more
CCFA announces new ambassador

CCFA announces new ambassador

Introducing Dr Dean Allen The Community Conservation Fund Africa (CCFA) is pleased to announce that Dr Dean Allen has accepted the role of ambassador for our organization. Originally from England, Dean has made South Africa and more specifically the Eastern Cape his...

read more

Water for Wildlife

Water for Wildlife

Water for Wildlife

Our Water for Wildlife project is an initiative designed to alleviate the effects of drought in South Africa’s Eastern Cape region. In response to the severe and prolonged drought that affected the area from 2015 – 2023, we implemented a plan to address the urgent need for surface water for the wild animals at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. Our goal to create watering holes for the wild animals was achieved by drilling several boreholes to feed waterholes for the wildlife. 

Project Overview

 

Project location: 
Nyosi Wildlife Reserve, Nelson Mandela Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa

Project category: 
Conservation

Project timeframe:
April – June 2023

 

Overview

 

Project location: 
Nyosi Wildlife Reserve, Nelson Mandela Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa

Project category: 
Conservation

Project timeframe:
April – June 2023

Project partners:

  • Global Humane

Project Vision:

  • Our vision for the project is to reduce the water-related stress on wildlife caused by the severe and long-lasting drought in South Africa’s Eastern Cape region, specifically at the Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. By creating watering holes for the animals, we alleviated the impact of the drought and provide a more hospitable environment for the wildlife to thrive in. This intervention will not only benefit the animals but also have a positive effect on the overall biodiversity of the reserve. Ultimately, our goal is to create a stress-free environment that allows the wildlife to flourish and thrive.

Project vision

Project Vision

Our vision for the project is to reduce the water-related stress on wildlife caused by the severe and long-lasting drought in South Africa’s Eastern Cape region, specifically at the Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. By creating watering holes for the animals, we hope to alleviate the impact of the drought and provide a more hospitable environment for the wildlife to thrive in. This intervention will not only benefit the animals but also have a positive effect on the overall biodiversity of the reserve. Ultimately, our goal is to create a stress-free environment that allows the wildlife to flourish and thrive.

Project Partners

Global Humane 

Project goals

Project goal
  • Create an additional 2 – 5 watering holes for wildlife at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve through boreholes with solar water pumps

 

Fundraising target
  • $7,500 per successful watering hole – borehole drilling and solar pump installation

Project updates

Water for Wildlife 2023
  • Exploration of the first identified site began in April 2023 and borehole drilling produced a water flow of 3,000 litres per hour, allowing for the creation of a watering hole. The site is situated in a natural marsh area to align with the ecosystem, and the pumping of water will commence once the solar pump has been procured and installed.
  • The second site explored in April 2023 was not successful. Drilling was done at an old watering hole site to a depth of 200 metres, producing no water. The team suspects this is an indicator of the severity of the region’s drought, as the hydrological survey looked highly promising for the site.
  • A third site was identified as very promising due to the specific underlying geology being explored along the eastern boundary of the reserve in May 2023. 
  • A second borehole was drilled in June 2023. 
  • Thanks to the new boreholes, two new waterholes were created for the wildlife and biodiversity
Image Gallery
Contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals, were adopted by the United Nations in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity. The 17 SDGs are integrated—they recognize that action in one area will affect outcomes in others, and that development must balance social, economic and environmental sustainability.

How to support this project

Donate