Meet the first ever cheetahs in our Rewilding Project

Meet the first ever cheetahs in our Rewilding Project

The first two cheetahs have arrived at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve!

Dubbed “the Kalahari siblings”, the brother and sister duo are beautiful and full of character but were separated from their mother at an early stage. They are now regaining their fitness and learning how to catch their own food.

We’re currently monitoring them around the clock, which can be challenging as they are very active and move large distances, but we love following their movements and seeing what they’re getting up to! Luckily, they are fitted with tracking devices which help us record their movements when they’re difficult to spot.

The arrival of these two cheetahs marks the start of our Cheetah Rewilding Project, an ambitious project to rewild as many captive cheetahs as possible while empowering community members. This is part of our larger vision to create a direct link of mutual benefit between endangered wildlife and local communities in southern Africa.

Following their three-month quarantine period and a 15-hour overnight journey by road, the young cheetahs have made great strides since arriving at the reserve, where they spent their first few weeks in a spacious enclosure. During this time, a local wildlife veterinarian fitted their tracking collars so that our conservation team can monitor their movements and activity. They have adapted well and are now thriving in their new home after being released from their spacious enclosure after three weeks. Our conservation team was delighted that they caught their own food within three days – a fully-grown Red Hartebeest!

They are monitored daily, and should they not catch their own food for a period of three days, we will provide food for them as they regain their fitness and hone their hunting skills. Although not captive-born cheetahs, the decision was made to enrol them in our Cheetah Rewilding Program as they were separated from their mother, and we want to ensure their readiness for translocation to a large reserve where there might be other predators. Because they are wild-born, we expect their rewilding phase to be under six months.

We plan to rehome them during the first quarter of 2023, with each cat going to separate reserves. This is important to prevent inbreeding and maintain the genetic diversity of this endangered species.

Stay tuned via social media and our website blog for further updates on the Kalahari siblings and the arrival of our first captive cheetah.

Additional information:

How to support our Cheetah Rewilding Project

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Meet the first ever cheetahs in our Rewilding Project

Meet the first ever cheetahs in our Rewilding Project

The first two cheetahs have arrived at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve!Dubbed “the Kalahari siblings”, the brother and sister duo are beautiful and full of character but were separated from their mother at an early stage. They are now regaining their fitness and learning how...

read more
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Cheetah Conservation Challenges

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CCFA celebrating Children’s Day 2020

CCFA celebrating Children’s Day 2020

The Declaration of the Rights of the Child, by the UN General Assembly, was announced on November 20, 1959 which is why Children’s Day in celebrated annually on this day. It is to honour the children of the world – our hope for the future and leaders of tomorrow.
This Children’s Day we’d like to salute all children but particularly the conservation warriors who are helping us build a better future

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Cheetah Conservation Challenges

Cheetah Conservation Challenges

Why are cheetahs threatened?

Cheetahs are the world’s fastest land animals, capable of reaching speeds up to 70 miles per hour (113 kilometres per hour). However, their speed is not enough to save them from the threats they face.

Cheetahs are listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. This means that they are at a high risk of extinction in the wild. It is estimated that there were around 100,000 cheetahs globally in 1900, but they have since been driven out of 89% of their historic range. While there were perhaps 40,000 wild cheetahs in 1960, there were reportedly fewer than 20,000 by 1975. Today there are only about 7,100 cheetahs left in the world.

The main causes of this decline are:

  • Loss and fragmentation of habitat due to agriculture and urbanization
  • Segregation of the cheetah population into 29 sub-populations which compromised their genetic integrity
  • The escalation of conflict between cheetahs and humans, particularly in livestock farming regions, leading to further persecution of the species
  • Inadequate protection measures. Many conservationists believe the conservation status for cheetahs is insufficient and are calling for cheetahs to be uplisted to ‘endangered’ which will afford them better protection measures
  • The illegal breeding of cheetahs for the exotic pet trade has further compromised their genetic integrity

Of the 7,100 cheetahs remaining in the world, it is estimated that between 1,166 and 1,742 cheetahs live in South Africa, with about 600 of these in captivity. Some of these captive cheetahs are managed for release into protected areas where they can integrate with free-roaming populations and help diversify the gene pool of the cheetah metapopulation. Cheetah reintroductions and relocations are coordinated by the Metapopulation Initiative to increase the cheetahs’ resident range and improve their genetic and demographic status. Our Cheetah Rewilding Project contributes to the success of the cheetah metapopulation, serving as an intermediate phase for captive cats to learn how to become self-sufficient and ‘bush-savvy’ for life in the wild.

Additional information:

How to support our Cheetah Rewilding Project

Related Posts

Meet the first ever cheetahs in our Rewilding Project

Meet the first ever cheetahs in our Rewilding Project

The first two cheetahs have arrived at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve!Dubbed “the Kalahari siblings”, the brother and sister duo are beautiful and full of character but were separated from their mother at an early stage. They are now regaining their fitness and learning how...

read more
Cheetah Conservation Challenges

Cheetah Conservation Challenges

Why are cheetahs threatened?Cheetahs are the world's fastest land animals, capable of reaching speeds up to 70 miles per hour (113 kilometres per hour). However, their speed is not enough to save them from the threats they face. Cheetahs are listed as vulnerable by...

read more
CCFA celebrating Children’s Day 2020

CCFA celebrating Children’s Day 2020

The Declaration of the Rights of the Child, by the UN General Assembly, was announced on November 20, 1959 which is why Children’s Day in celebrated annually on this day. It is to honour the children of the world – our hope for the future and leaders of tomorrow.
This Children’s Day we’d like to salute all children but particularly the conservation warriors who are helping us build a better future

read more

Let’s Plant a Better Future …Together

Let’s Plant a Better Future …Together

Let’s Plant a Better Future …Together

‘The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.’

 [Chinese Proverb]

At the heart of our vision and mission is our ‘Green Print’ – which is to find creative, collaborative solutions to inspire and assist communities to be at the helm of conservation in wilderness areas.

Greening the Community is one of these solutions. It’s a long-term empowerment and environmental sustainability initiative. Aimed at local communities, the goal is to drive environmental change at grass roots level. It’s designed to encourage young people, in particular, to play a pivotal part in ensuring a better future for all. And to become passionate conservation advocates.  This is a pilot project launching in the Eastern Cape (South Africa) but which could be rolled out to other communities.

Together with our partners and supporters, the Greening the Community project will:

  • Contribute towards the alleviation of poverty through job creation
  • Assist with personal and social transformation
  • Change and uplift communities
  • Create a sustainable future and help offset carbon emissions by planting trees through our Adopt-a-Tree campaign

ADOPT-A-TREE CAMPAIGN

Planting Trees for a Better Future

He that plants trees loves others beside himself [Thomas Fuller]

The Adopt-a-Tree campaign is the first in a series of initiatives to support the Greening the Community project. The idea is to bring nature back to the KwaNobhule township in Gqeberha (Port Elizabeth, South Africa). It’s about cultivating green landscapes to improve the environment and lives of the 121 800 community members.

The concept was inspired by the Indalo Nursery operating from the local Mantis Collection property at the Hopewell Conservation Estate. The vision: To raise funds to plant 600 trees at schools, churches and safe spaces within KwaNobuhle over the next 12 months. The location was chosen as the Eastern Cape is the heart and home of Mantis properties, where it all began 21 years ago.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Even though Arbor Month is drawing to a close, you can get involved by adopting a tree or a cluster of trees – it’s a win-win for our people and our planet. Click here to adopt

 

THE ‘GRASS ROOTS’ SOLUTION

To ensure the sustainability of the project, practical experience and education are its foundation – especially for the young people of KwaNobhule, where unemployment levels are as high as 29% and more than half the community live below the poverty line.

It begins with a 21-day educational Youth Development Empowerment Programme for 20 vulnerable youths covering life skills, employability, indigenous horticulture, plant handling, traditional medicine and general conservation awareness and practices.

There is also an immersive Wilderness and Nature Trail Camping Experience for 20 youths, a paid horticultural internship for two students at Indalo Nurseries as well as post-course assistance (mentoring, guidance with CV writing, help finding a job).

Over the years CCFA has funded several courses and wishes to continue this on an annual basis. Click [here] read more.

Future project phases include:

  • Assisting Indalo Nurseries to open a retail nursery in KwaNobuhle
  • Innovative Carbon Reduction Initiatives for eco-conscious travelers

Greening community initiative

21 day Siyazenzela training

CLIMBING NEW HEIGHTS

On September 24, South Africans celebrated Heritage Day which is a time to reflect on the past, the history that shaped the nation and contemplate the future  On this special day, well-known local extreme athlete and Community Conservation Fund Africa (CCFA) supporter, Steven Lancaster, embarked on a mammoth challenge. His goal: To complete a grueling 8849m run – his own Mount Everest – within 24 hours.  Why? Besides his dream to ‘summit’ Mount Everest, Steven also wanted to inspire individuals, corporates and the active environment-focused lifestyle community – to plant trees for a better future.

The location for this fundraising ‘Everresting Challenge’ was a 700m long route along Brickmakers Kloof Road, in Baakens Valley (Nelson Mandela Bay), known as the city’s green lungs. To reach the Mount Everest target, he needed to summit this 700m climb (at a 63m elevation) 141 times. Not only did he achieve this but pushed further, summiting an additional 25 times as he climbed up to 10 000m … well ahead of the 24 hour time limit.

We want to give a big shout out to Steven for his perseverance, endurance and passion to make a difference.

We can sit back, do nothing and watch our planet be destroyed.

Or we can take action, become advocates and start making lifestyle choices which are kinder to people and the planet. [Kira Simpson]

GET INVOLVED

Adopt-a-Tree Prize Draw – 2 nights for 2 with Mantis Collection

We invite you to be part of the solution, by planting for a better future today.  Adopt-a-tree at R300 per tree or a cluster of 10 trees for R3000.  Not only will you be changing the lives of the KwaNobuhle community but you will also help offset carbon emissions…

You will also be in line to win some great prizes by the Mantis Collection – 2 nights for 2 at Oceana Beach & Wildlife Resort or at Pearl Valley Hotel by Mantis.

Adopt-a-Tree | Prize Draw for individuals – 1 to 9 trees

2 nights for 2 at Oceana Beach & Wildlife Resorts with game drives

Adopt-a-Cluster | Prize Draw for corporates – 10 or more trees

Employee Luxury Incentive – Couple experience

2 nights for 2 at Pearl Valley Golf Estate Hotel on B&B basis, a round of golf for and a Master Wine-Tasting experience at Fairview Wine Estate.

Thank You to all our Supporters

Our heartfelt thanks to you – our ‘eco-warriors’ – for rising to the challenge and supporting our Greening the Community initiative.  From individuals who made a donation or bought a tree, to corporates sponsoring clusters of trees and our international community.  Without you, none of this would be possible.

Donors – Siyazenzela Youth Development Training

VWSA, Cerebos and special thanks to the Nedbank SA Charity Golf Day who have included CCFA as one of their beneficiaries.

Donors – Everest Event

VWSA, Algoa FM, Bridge Street Brewery, Mantis Collection

Corporate supporters for branding sponsorship, donations and/or purchasing tree clusters

Cerebos, Algoa FM, Borbet SA, MTN, Spar, Tent House Structures, HR123, Standard Bank, Aberdare Cables, Umicore, KPMG, MBDA, NMBM, Online Direct, Continental Tyres 

The indispensable Everesting event team of volunteers, supporters, service providers and sponsors

Steven Lancaster

Bongani Mvulane, Blackie Witbooi, Ayanda Smith of Indalo Nurseries

Bruce & Tracey Campbell of Aspire Live Fit

Ilona Hearne – Bio kineticist

Wayne & Nikki Bolton of One Land Love It

Luvuyo Bangazi of MBDA (marketing/logistics support)

Allister Marran of Charlo Athletic Club (Chief Marshal)

Phrosne Philips of Go See Do (Safety Officer)

Clinton Swartz of HRG Security

Eugene Muller of ECMR Medical Service
Denis Goddard of Under African Skys (Videographer)

Richard Pearce of Richard Pearce Photography

Brad Hiles of Talisman Hire (portable trailer unit – toilet)

Warren Lloyd of Barron (Branded clothing & CCFA Gazebo)

Linda Harwood of Harwood Promotions (Event Management)

Keri Martens-Wright of Algorithm Digital (social media/photography)

 

Bees and People Together – South Africa

Bees and People Together – South Africa

The hum of bees is the voice of the garden.

[Elizabeth Lawrence]

May 20 is World Bee Day, a day to pay homage to these tiny little miracles of nature that not only pollinate our flowers but are largely responsible for our crops and food. If there were no bees there would be no more pollination, plants, animals or man.

World Bee Day reminds us of that and acknowledges the critical role bees play in our ecosystem.

It is estimated that a third of the food we consume relies predominantly on pollination by bees … but our tiny heroes are under threat.  Across the world there has been a growing concern about the decline in the bee population, mainly due to intensive farming, loss of habitat, improper use of pesticides and climate change.

The theme for World Bee Day 2021 is ‘Bee Engaged’. Let’s take a moment to learn a little bit more about bees and our new ‘Adopt-a-Hive project.

 

Let it bee

The team at Community Conservation Fund Africa (CCFA) has been hard at work to help prevent the colony collapse of bees and, in 2019, relocated and introduced 120 new bee hives onto three Mantis properties in the Eastern Cape: Hopewell Conservation Estate, Founders Lodge and Intle Boutique Hotel.  With an average of 50 000 to 75 000 bees per hive, this has created a habitat for around 9 million bees.  And, in addition it’s given bees a new base from which to buzz, dance, pollinate and produce honey and save the world. The project has also created much needed employment.

CCFA is extending its bee project to the Western Cape by installing 70 beehives at two sites: The Honey House on Willowdale Farm in Stanford and on Hazendal – a Mantis property located in Paarl.

Be part of the solution

Most of the world’s food crops – like fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds – that form an integral part of our everyday diet, depend on bees and other pollinators to exist​.  The adopt-a-hive project, in collaboration with Honeybee Heroes, offers you a simple, hands-off way to help honeybees and nature’s pollination process.  ​

Adopt-a-Hive

For an investment of £100 (R2 000) you can adopt a honeybee hive and, in return, besides being a bee hero, you receive:

  • A personalised plaque on your beehive (this can either be for yourself, a partner, business or a gift for someone special)
  • An official adoption certificate
  • Hive progress updates
  • A Beekeeping Experience  (*T&Cs apply)

The honey produced will be stocked and sold at Mantis properties, with the profits reinvested into the development of more hives.

The buzz about bees

Not all bees are the same. There are an astonishing 2 755 bee species in sub-Saharan Africa and about a third of these are in South Africa.  Here are 10 fascinating facts about bees:

  • To produce 1.6kg of honey it takes 556 worker bees and 2 million flowers
  • The average honeybee makes only one twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime and visits 50 to 100 flowers during a collection trip
  • A honeybee can fly, up to 9km at an average speed of 25km/hour
  • A colony consists of worker bees, drones and one queen. Worker bees are female, they live for about six weeks and do all the work. The male honey bees (drones) do no work, all they do is mate
  • The queen bee lives for about 2 -3 years, she is at her busiest in summer when she lays 2 500 eggs per day
  • Honey bees communicate with each other by ‘dancing’
  • The bees’ buzz is the sound made by their wings which beat 200 times per second
  • The honey bee is the only insect that produces food eaten by man
  • Honeybees never sleep
  • Honey is incredibly healthy and includes enzymes, vitamins and minerals. It’s the only food that contains “pinocembrin”, an antioxidant associated with improved brain functioning.

Did you know?

  • Bees can see a colour imperceptible to humans and known as ‘bee’s purple’. It is a combination of yellow and UV light

Looking ahead

Building on the initial bee relocation and bee-keeping project in the Eastern Cape and the setting up of these beehives in the Western Cape, CCFA aims to continue creating small micro-businesses. The goal is to set up 1 000 micro-apiaries all over South Africa, donating hives, bee-suits and basic tools to rural South Africans in need, in order for them to start up their own businesses.

Once installed, the hives and bees belong to the community and the honey produced will be sold back to CCFA to sell through Mantis properties and local businesses. This will provide jobs and income for the local community.

In addition, as part of its immersive environmental activities for guests, CCFA and Mantis will be adding a Beekeeping Experience to its tourist offering. This includes a three-hour edutainment session with a hive tour and lunch at Willowdale Farm (*T&Cs apply).

‘Bee Engaged’, join us in the fight to protect our hard working little bees who contribute to complex, interconnected ecosystems that allow a diverse number of different species to co-exist. After all, bees keep the world sweet.

If the bee disappeared off the surface of the globe then man would only have four years of life left. No more bees, no more pollination, no more plants, no more animals, no more man.
[Albert Einstein]

To adopt-a-beehive, donate to the project or learn more about environmental projects, contact the CCFA.

Website: https://www.ccfa.africa/beekeeping/

Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/ccfa.africa/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ccfa_africa/

 

(*T&Cs: the Beehive Experience excludes transport to/from Willowdale Farm in Stanford and is for a minimum of four people.)

‘Conservation is a state of harmony between people and land’  From the Chairman’s Desk

‘Conservation is a state of harmony between people and land’ From the Chairman’s Desk

‘Conservation is a state of harmony between people and land

From the Chairman’s Desk…

 

The start of a new year has never before been welcomed with such enthusiasm.  2020 was an intensely disruptive year with the impact of Covid-19 and the subsequent lockdowns affecting everyone. The long-term implications of the global pandemic will be felt for years.  And, although we are by no means out of the woods in terms of the coronavirus and the second wave of infections, we are relieved not to be back in total lockdown and that a vaccine is in sight.  There are signs that the economy is starting to get back on track and, most importantly, that the tourism industry will start opening up again, albeit slowly.

The Community Conservation Fund Africa (CCFA) is intrinsically linked to tourism. Its very foundation is based on responsible tourism and working with local communities to protect and conserve our wilderness areas – our unique fauna and flora. The team, partners and communities we work alongside, have made huge strides in achieving our goals and objectives. We are happy to say there have been positive outcomes and the ripple effect of our agile approach to challenges, is paying off. We are proud of our achievements and it warms my conservation heart to know we are making a difference, despite the challenges of 2020.

The past year was not an easy one. We all felt the effect the pandemic had on people, economies, governments and tourism. Without tourists the properties within the Mantis Collection were unable to operate, which had a huge impact on the Company, its employees and suppliers. There was also a devastating knock-on effect in the communities we support.  Many lost their concessions and livelihoods, which put them under enormous financial pressure and food security became a concern. As the entire country began to experience the impact of Covid-19, ensuring the survival of people became a priority.

This meant we had to adapt our strategy to respond to this crisis in manner that supported our projects and the challenges facing our beneficiaries. To assist the very communities that had supported our conservation initiatives over the past few years.  And we did.

As we reflect on the successes of 2020, what becomes clear is that this was only made possible by the CCFA team’s dedication and hard work.  It was about everyone being flexible in adapting to the changes we are facing.  This has made our commitment to achieving our goals stronger: Working together to build a better Africa for our communities, our wildlife and our future tourists.

Sponsored students completing their Field Guide Training

Below, a quick review on some of the 2020 ‘highlights’.   A wonderful achievement that shows the tenacity of CCFA … especially given the circumstances.

Harvesting and bottling CCFA honey

Fundraising event in London with historian and storyteller, Michael Charlton

The road ahead

One of the key learning from this global crisis is the importance and strength of partnerships to achieve positive outcomes. We need to be open to adapting to our changing environment and, as long as there is commitment from an organisation to deliver on its social contract, many hurdles and challenges can be overcome. 

We have set goals for 2021, some include:

  • Creating food gardens in two different communities, to establish a sustainable food source
  • Planting 300 indigenous and fruit trees within the first 6 months of the year as part of our Greening the Community Project
  • Enrolling 20 Students on the Wilderness Foundation Africa’s Siyazenzela Life and Employability Course
  • Tripling the number of beehives  – enabling a sustainable food source and creating more employment opportunities
  • Hosting and co-ordinating sex education classes in Namibia and the distribution of reusable sanitary towels

In addition to our goals and ‘wish lists’ for 2021 and beyond, we will continue to grow strategic partnerships and mentor communities to secure a better future for our wilderness areas. 

Partnering with Indalo for the Greening the Community Project 

We wish to thank you for your continued support and are hopeful that 2021 will be a better one for the world.

 

We all know that, ‘‘Even the smallest voice can make a difference in a big way’

Related Posts

Meet the first ever cheetahs in our Rewilding Project

Meet the first ever cheetahs in our Rewilding Project

The first two cheetahs have arrived at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve!Dubbed “the Kalahari siblings”, the brother and sister duo are beautiful and full of character but were separated from their mother at an early stage. They are now regaining their fitness and learning how...

read more
Cheetah Conservation Challenges

Cheetah Conservation Challenges

Why are cheetahs threatened?Cheetahs are the world's fastest land animals, capable of reaching speeds up to 70 miles per hour (113 kilometres per hour). However, their speed is not enough to save them from the threats they face. Cheetahs are listed as vulnerable by...

read more
CCFA celebrating Children’s Day 2020

CCFA celebrating Children’s Day 2020

The Declaration of the Rights of the Child, by the UN General Assembly, was announced on November 20, 1959 which is why Children’s Day in celebrated annually on this day. It is to honour the children of the world – our hope for the future and leaders of tomorrow.
This Children’s Day we’d like to salute all children but particularly the conservation warriors who are helping us build a better future

read more

CCFA Guest Sanitizer Kits

CCFA Guest Sanitizer Kits

CCFA Guest Sanitizer Kits

Stay Safe!

The wellbeing of our guests and staff has always been our top priority, now more than ever. So, in addition to the strict and appropriate health and safety protocols being followed at all Mantis Collection Properties, we present to you a personal ‘care travel pack’. The care pack conforms with hospitality Covid-19 requirements and the selection of the 60ml bottles also observes the International Airline standards for inbound passengers.

This pack was co-ordinated by Community Conservation Fund Africa (CCFA) in consultation with Cerebos and its Purist product brand.

 

CCFA is a registered non-profit company, founded by Mantis and Accor, to address the social and environmental imbalances and find workable solutions to the growing conservation crisis. CCFA is intrinsically linked to tourism. Its very foundation is based on responsible tourism and working with local communities to protect and conserve our wilderness areas – our unique fauna and flora.

The beautiful Shwe Shwe fabric bag, was designed and sewn by women at a job creation project supported by CCFA.  Based in Kylemore in the Western Cape, this group of women sew the Mantis mascots but during the Covid-19 pandemic they turned their skills to producing masks.  They delivered 2 500 masks, some of which were sold to sustain their income and others donated to healthcare workers and underprivileged children in South Africa.  Click here for additional information on CCFA projects.

Included in your care pack are the following personal protection items:

  • 1 x Purist hygiene anti-vital hand sanitizer 80% Alcohol based – SABS approved and WHO verified.
  • 1 x Purist hygiene surface disinfectant cleaner that uses twin-chain technology to kill 99.9% of all germs
  • 1 x Purist anti-bacterial, anti-fungal hand soap, shown to kill 99.9% of all known germs. Contains hand care additives, leaving your hands moisturized and squeaky clean, after use
  • 3 disposable face masks

 Thank you for choosing to stay with us as we celebrate the return of tourism at a time when our wildlife and local community need it most.

Remember: Stay Safe!  

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

For external use only

Keep away from children 

Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact rinse continuously for several minutes. If irritation persists, seek medical advice/attention  

Harmful If swallowed. Seek medical advice immediately

Discontinue use immediately if any skin irritation or allergic reaction occurs