Water for Wildlife

Water for Wildlife

Water for Wildlife

Our Water for Wildlife project is an initiative designed to alleviate the effects of drought in South Africa’s Eastern Cape region. In response to the severe and prolonged drought that affected the area from 2015 – 2023, we implemented a plan to address the urgent need for surface water for the wild animals at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. Our goal to create watering holes for the wild animals was achieved by drilling several boreholes to feed waterholes for the wildlife. 

Project Overview

 

Project location: 
Nyosi Wildlife Reserve, Nelson Mandela Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa

Project category: 
Conservation

Project timeframe:
April – June 2023

 

Overview

 

Project location: 
Nyosi Wildlife Reserve, Nelson Mandela Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa

Project category: 
Conservation

Project timeframe:
April – June 2023

Project partners:

  • Global Humane

Project Vision:

  • Our vision for the project is to reduce the water-related stress on wildlife caused by the severe and long-lasting drought in South Africa’s Eastern Cape region, specifically at the Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. By creating watering holes for the animals, we alleviated the impact of the drought and provide a more hospitable environment for the wildlife to thrive in. This intervention will not only benefit the animals but also have a positive effect on the overall biodiversity of the reserve. Ultimately, our goal is to create a stress-free environment that allows the wildlife to flourish and thrive.

Project vision

Project Vision

Our vision for the project is to reduce the water-related stress on wildlife caused by the severe and long-lasting drought in South Africa’s Eastern Cape region, specifically at the Nyosi Wildlife Reserve. By creating watering holes for the animals, we hope to alleviate the impact of the drought and provide a more hospitable environment for the wildlife to thrive in. This intervention will not only benefit the animals but also have a positive effect on the overall biodiversity of the reserve. Ultimately, our goal is to create a stress-free environment that allows the wildlife to flourish and thrive.

Project Partners

Global Humane 

Project goals

Project goal
  • Create an additional 2 – 5 watering holes for wildlife at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve through boreholes with solar water pumps

 

Fundraising target
  • $7,500 per successful watering hole – borehole drilling and solar pump installation

Project updates

Water for Wildlife 2023
  • Exploration of the first identified site began in April 2023 and borehole drilling produced a water flow of 3,000 litres per hour, allowing for the creation of a watering hole. The site is situated in a natural marsh area to align with the ecosystem, and the pumping of water will commence once the solar pump has been procured and installed.
  • The second site explored in April 2023 was not successful. Drilling was done at an old watering hole site to a depth of 200 metres, producing no water. The team suspects this is an indicator of the severity of the region’s drought, as the hydrological survey looked highly promising for the site.
  • A third site was identified as very promising due to the specific underlying geology being explored along the eastern boundary of the reserve in May 2023. 
  • A second borehole was drilled in June 2023. 
  • Thanks to the new boreholes, two new waterholes were created for the wildlife and biodiversity
Image Gallery
Contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals, were adopted by the United Nations in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity. The 17 SDGs are integrated—they recognize that action in one area will affect outcomes in others, and that development must balance social, economic and environmental sustainability.

How to support this project

Donate

Greening the Community

Greening the Community

Greening the Community

Greening the Community is a long-term empowerment and environmental sustainability initiative for the local community of Kwa Nobuhle in Nelson Mandela Bay, Eastern Cape to drive environmental awareness practices at grass roots levels. It is designed to inspire change and encourage young people in particular to play their part in ensuring a prosperous future for all.

Project Overview

 

Project location: 
Nyosi Wildlife Reserve, Kwa Nobuhle – Nelson Mandela Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa

Project category: 
Sustainability, Community, Conservation

Project timeframe:
2019 – 2022

 

Overview

 

Project location: 
Nyosi Wildlife Reserve, Kwa Nobuhle – Nelson Mandela Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa

Project category: 
Sustainability, Community, Conservation

Project timeframe:
2019 – 2022 

Project partners:

  • Indalo NPC
  • Wilderness Foundation Africa

Project Vision:

  • For Indalo to open and sustain a nursery in Kwa Nobuhle
  • Create empowerment and upskill people
  • Preserve the biocultural landscape
  • Educate our youth
  • To see a visible Greening of the Kwa Nobuhle landscape
  • To spark public interest through an annual fundraising event

Project vision

Project vision
  • For Indalo to open and sustain a nursery in Kwa Nobuhle
  • Create empowerment and upskill people
  • Preserve the biocultural landscape
  • Educate our youth
  • To see a visible Greening of the Kwa Nobuhle landscape
  • To spark public interest through an annual fundraising event
Project Partners
  • Indalo NPC
  • Wilderness Foundation Africa
  • Nyosi Wildlife Reserve 

 

Project goals

Project goals
  • Plant 600 trees in the township of Kwa Nobuhle by mid-2022
  • Enrol 20 students from Kwa Nobuhle in the Siyazenzela Life Skills and Employability Program in 2021
  • Provide internships for two selected graduates for six months with Indalo at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve in 2022
  • Indalo hope to open their own nursery in their community

Project updates

Project results
  • We exceeded our goal of planting 600 trees in the township of Kwa Nobuhle by mid-2022 in 12 different schools. Over 300 school pupils attended the different tree planting days, benefitting from environmental and biocultural awareness delivered by the Indalo and CCFA teams. Indalo selected the school who took the best care of their trees and a class of 30 students from VM Kwinana School enjoyed an educational safari day with lunch at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve with Indalo.
  • CCFA hosted a fundraising event in Nelson Mandela Bay called ‘Everesting’ where ultra-athlete Steven Lancaster undertook this epic challenge in aid of the project. With the Everesting concept, you pick a hill, anywhere in the world and then run or ride repeats of it, in a single activity, until you have climbed 8 849m – the equivalent ascent of Mount Everest. During the 24-hour period, Lancaster aimed to summit Brickmakers Kloof Road 165 times. Each summit was 700m long with a 63m elevation. The average gradient is a challenging 9% but tops out at 12% in the first 300m. (The steepest gradient in the Tour de France is 13%). His ‘Mount Everest’ was reached after 141 summits; However, he aimed to run further and achieved a height of 10 000m.
  • We enrolled 20 students from Kwa Nobuhle in the Siyazenzela Life Skills and Employability Programme in 2021
  • We provided six-month internships for two graduates selected by Indalo at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve in 2022. One of the interns accepted an offer of permanent employment at the Reserve following her internship and she is an aspiring field guide.
  • Indalo have revised their goal of opening a nursery in Kwa Nobuhle, and continue to operate their nursery at Nyosi Wildlife Reserve.

Image Gallery
Contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals, were adopted by the United Nations in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity. The 17 SDGs are integrated—they recognize that action in one area will affect outcomes in others, and that development must balance social, economic and environmental sustainability.

How to support this project

Donate

Bees and People Together – South Africa

Bees and People Together – South Africa

The hum of bees is the voice of the garden.

[Elizabeth Lawrence]

May 20 is World Bee Day, a day to pay homage to these tiny little miracles of nature that not only pollinate our flowers but are largely responsible for our crops and food. If there were no bees there would be no more pollination, plants, animals or man.

World Bee Day reminds us of that and acknowledges the critical role bees play in our ecosystem.

It is estimated that a third of the food we consume relies predominantly on pollination by bees … but our tiny heroes are under threat.  Across the world there has been a growing concern about the decline in the bee population, mainly due to intensive farming, loss of habitat, improper use of pesticides and climate change.

The theme for World Bee Day 2021 is ‘Bee Engaged’. Let’s take a moment to learn a little bit more about bees and our new ‘Adopt-a-Hive project.

 

Let it bee

The team at Community Conservation Fund Africa (CCFA) has been hard at work to help prevent the colony collapse of bees and, in 2019, relocated and introduced 120 new bee hives onto three Mantis properties in the Eastern Cape: Hopewell Conservation Estate, Founders Lodge and Intle Boutique Hotel.  With an average of 50 000 to 75 000 bees per hive, this has created a habitat for around 9 million bees.  And, in addition it’s given bees a new base from which to buzz, dance, pollinate and produce honey and save the world. The project has also created much needed employment.

CCFA is extending its bee project to the Western Cape by installing 70 beehives at two sites: The Honey House on Willowdale Farm in Stanford and on Hazendal – a Mantis property located in Paarl.

Be part of the solution

Most of the world’s food crops – like fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds – that form an integral part of our everyday diet, depend on bees and other pollinators to exist​.  The adopt-a-hive project, in collaboration with Honeybee Heroes, offers you a simple, hands-off way to help honeybees and nature’s pollination process.  ​

Adopt-a-Hive

For an investment of £100 (R2 000) you can adopt a honeybee hive and, in return, besides being a bee hero, you receive:

  • A personalised plaque on your beehive (this can either be for yourself, a partner, business or a gift for someone special)
  • An official adoption certificate
  • Hive progress updates
  • A Beekeeping Experience  (*T&Cs apply)

The honey produced will be stocked and sold at Mantis properties, with the profits reinvested into the development of more hives.

The buzz about bees

Not all bees are the same. There are an astonishing 2 755 bee species in sub-Saharan Africa and about a third of these are in South Africa.  Here are 10 fascinating facts about bees:

  • To produce 1.6kg of honey it takes 556 worker bees and 2 million flowers
  • The average honeybee makes only one twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime and visits 50 to 100 flowers during a collection trip
  • A honeybee can fly, up to 9km at an average speed of 25km/hour
  • A colony consists of worker bees, drones and one queen. Worker bees are female, they live for about six weeks and do all the work. The male honey bees (drones) do no work, all they do is mate
  • The queen bee lives for about 2 -3 years, she is at her busiest in summer when she lays 2 500 eggs per day
  • Honey bees communicate with each other by ‘dancing’
  • The bees’ buzz is the sound made by their wings which beat 200 times per second
  • The honey bee is the only insect that produces food eaten by man
  • Honeybees never sleep
  • Honey is incredibly healthy and includes enzymes, vitamins and minerals. It’s the only food that contains “pinocembrin”, an antioxidant associated with improved brain functioning.

Did you know?

  • Bees can see a colour imperceptible to humans and known as ‘bee’s purple’. It is a combination of yellow and UV light

Looking ahead

Building on the initial bee relocation and bee-keeping project in the Eastern Cape and the setting up of these beehives in the Western Cape, CCFA aims to continue creating small micro-businesses. The goal is to set up 1 000 micro-apiaries all over South Africa, donating hives, bee-suits and basic tools to rural South Africans in need, in order for them to start up their own businesses.

Once installed, the hives and bees belong to the community and the honey produced will be sold back to CCFA to sell through Mantis properties and local businesses. This will provide jobs and income for the local community.

In addition, as part of its immersive environmental activities for guests, CCFA and Mantis will be adding a Beekeeping Experience to its tourist offering. This includes a three-hour edutainment session with a hive tour and lunch at Willowdale Farm (*T&Cs apply).

‘Bee Engaged’, join us in the fight to protect our hard working little bees who contribute to complex, interconnected ecosystems that allow a diverse number of different species to co-exist. After all, bees keep the world sweet.

If the bee disappeared off the surface of the globe then man would only have four years of life left. No more bees, no more pollination, no more plants, no more animals, no more man.
[Albert Einstein]

To adopt-a-beehive, donate to the project or learn more about environmental projects, contact the CCFA.

Website: https://www.ccfa.africa/beekeeping/

Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/ccfa.africa/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ccfa_africa/

 

(*T&Cs: the Beehive Experience excludes transport to/from Willowdale Farm in Stanford and is for a minimum of four people.)

Community Borehole Project – Namibia

Community Borehole Project – Namibia

Water for the community – Borehole construction

Borehole project: Kasika Conservancy, Zambezi region, Namibia

 

CCFA is pleased to have supported this community conservation initiative to provide safe and convenient access to water as well as assisting communities in their efforts to grow crops for subsistence farming (with a focus on fish and mielies), to feed their families and perhaps in the future create a living that extends further than the grant system.

After the successful completion of the first borehole in November 2020 in the Maliyazwa Village, CCFA wishes to provide further communities with four more much-needed boreholes. The additional boreholes will be piped to at least 8 strategically positioned outlets in order to allow for even distribution within the community, serving at least 400 people. The nearest river is a great distance away from the community and the presence of wild animals such as hippo and crocodiles in the river and on the river banks, makes collecting water there a life threatening task. Many community members have already lost their lives over trying to access this water source.

First borehole construction completed, November 2020

Mr Libuku’s village (Maliyazwa) is home to a community of approximately 40 people, who are now able to access water safely, thanks to the recent construction of a borehole in their village. This is a pure luxury for the community who had previously resorted to descending 10 metres into a collapsed water well to collect water to fulfil  their basic needs for survival. Standing on the collapsed edges of the well to access water was a life threatening feat in that there were no reinforcements surrounding the structure. The water table had dropped due to drought conditions, hence the need to descend at least 10 metres below ground level.

The recent borehole construction at Libuku Village has provided the many elderly people, as well as those in poor health living there, with easier access to water. The act of collecting water from a well and walking far distances to a water source, was not available to these physically challenged community members. Now, water points are located closer to the homestead and the borehole has been fitted with a sediment filter (a bidden wrapped around the intake pipe) to keep larger debris out of the water.

Jamanda Community Conservancy – Zimbabwe

Jamanda Community Conservancy – Zimbabwe

JAMANDA COMMUNITY CONSERVANCY PROJECT

The Jamanda Community Conservancy (JCC) in Zimbabwe is a project focused around facilitating the co-existence of rural communities and wildlife, to further support the existing CAMPFIRE program (Communal Areas Management Program for Indigenous Resources).

CAMPFIRE was established in response to clashes between a tribal community that was moved off its land in 1966 to make way for wildlife reserves, Ghonarezhou National Park and the Department of National Parks. This community is today known as the Mahenye community and is situated just outside Ghonarezhou. It is regarded as Zimbabwe’s finest example of a CAMPFIRE program.

The most recent expansion of the project has been by the Mahenye community who have set aside 7,000 hectares of land to establish the JCC. The JCC shares a 12km boundary with Gonarezhou Park allowing wildlife free movement. A 25km game fence funded by the EU minimises the risk of human-wildlife conflict. A headquarters, workshop, reception office and three ranger bases are under construction and should be completed by the end of the year.

The challenge for this community conservation initiative is for them to become self-sufficient in meeting their operational costs and in contributing to the improvement of livelihoods of the community at large. To this end the Jamanda Steering Committee has identified an income-generating project through the development of a low key non-consumptive tourist camp. The economic viability of this camp will determine the success or failure of the entire project.

The CCFA proudly funded the construction of a 12-bed self-catering camp within the Jamanda Conservancy, on the Save River, which overlooks the Gonarezhou National Park. The camp will offer guests a cultural visit to the villages, game activities and game drives into the GRZ Park.

The final phase of the project is to secure sufficient funding to meet the cost of game capture and translocation of wildlife from private conservancies, in order to fast-track product development by providing a competitive wildlife experience. The focus will be on plains game, as species such as elephant and predators will naturally move in from the GRZ Park.

Human Elephant Coexistence – Namibia

Human Elephant Coexistence – Namibia

ELEPHANT CONSERVATION AND HUMAN ELEPHANT CONFLICT MITIGATION PROGRAMME

CCFA is pleased to have supported an initiative that is creating harmony between communities and wildlife in the Kunene region of Namibia.

Ombonde People’s Park, located in the Kunene region, is home to desert-adapted elephant, black rhino, giraffe, lion and cheetah – all vulnerable or threatened in Africa.  The Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation’s (IRDNC) Elephant conservation and human-elephant mitigation programme, aims to prevent poaching in the area, while enhancing and building on community ownership of wildlife and natural resources. This is an authentic partnership between community conservancies and the government.

Drought is a constant threat that affects basic living standards and survival. It creates social strains such as unemployment, hunger and an increase in human-wildlife conflict scenarios. Many predators have moved closer to the homesteads, preying on livestock and destroying gardens because they are struggling to source water and food in their own habitats. Similarly, some farmers are encroaching on core wildlife zones in search of better grazing opportunities for their livestock.

There are currently 674 conservancy members working towards the common goal to live peacefully alongside wildlife by employing sustainable livelihood practices.

Various meetings held between January 2018 and August 2019, facilitated by the IRDNC team members, focused on plans to introduce a community garden and erect a solar-powered electric fence to protect it from elephants and other wildlife.

Funding for the project was approved after we received a project outline and application at the 2018 Conservation Lab. It is a project that is aligned with our overarching ethos: Working with local communities to preserve conservation.

CCFA previously donated U$25 000 toward the cost of erecting an electric fence around the community’s food garden which is about 140 625 m² (14 hectares). In addition to the fence, we also secured a commitment from the local council to provide water to the conservancy, to ensure the farming project is sustainable and improves the lives of the community.

The electric fence is comprised of 3 live strands and 2 earth wires. The energiser is a powerful unit, with 8 Joules stored energy – strong enough to deter elephants. It includes a solar PV panel and cover and operates independently of any grid.

The easy to assemble and maintain system, was installed by the community and overseen by the IRDNC Human Wildlife Support team. The community was tasked to nominate a ‘tech savvy’ community member to be trained on how to install the fence and operate the ‘fence tester’ apparatus to allow for fuss-free maintenance.  There will be community ownership regarding the upkeep of the property.

 

Although this practical intervention – the installation of an electric fence – has addressed one of the major problems faced by the community, ongoing strategic interaction between the IRDNC and surrounding communities will continue in the form of:

  • Continuing to identify community concerns around the encroaching elephant population, in order to formulate effective actions towards a more peaceful co-existence.
  • Creating and maintaining awareness about the negative impact of elephant poaching as well as the economic and environmental benefits of cohabiting peacefully with the elephants
  • Monitoring of elephant populations and their movements
  • Gathering data around elephant conflict and determining the cost of any damage to properties and farming livestock to find creative solutions to mitigate these situations
  • Incentivising communities by adding value through tourism, offering training that will enable them to find jobs in the wildlife tourism industry.

 

Latest Update

Great strides have been made in the Kunene Region of Namibia to help create harmonious living conditions between the 674 Ongongo conservancy members – living within the Ombonde People’s Park – and neighbouring wildlife.

The problem

Drought remains the main environmental problem experienced by the Ongongo conservancy. It impacts basic survival and living standards, creates social strains such as unemployment and hunger and increases human-wildlife conflict scenarios. Many predators have moved closer to the homesteads because they are struggling to source water and food in their own habitats and, similarly, some farmers are encroaching on core wildlife zones in search of better grazing opportunities for their livestock.

 

 

The easy to assemble and maintain fence was installed by the 20-strong team, overseen by the IRDNC Human Wildlife Support team.

Designed to deter the elephants, the fence comprises 3 live strands and 2 earth wires.  The energizer is a powerful unit with 8 joules stored energy and comes with a solar PV panel and cover and operates independently of any grid.

The solution

This particular project focused on assisting the community, especially the women, by erecting an electric fence around the community garden to deter elephants – and other animals – from ruining their crops.

 

 

Transferring of skills

The community were educated about the hazards of the ‘live’ fence and how to avoid contact with electricity. Two community members have been trained to monitor and guard the fence while another two are now competent to offer technical support and fence maintenance.

Next steps

Although this practical intervention has addressed one of the major problems faced by the community, ongoing strategic interaction between the IRDNC and surrounding communities will continue in the form of:

  • Identifying community concerns around the encroaching elephant population to help formulate effective actions that will allow a peaceful co-existence
  • Creating and maintaining awareness about the negative impact of elephant poaching as well as the economic and environmental benefits of cohabiting peacefully with the elephants
  • Monitoring the elephant populations and their movements
  • Gathering data around elephant conflict to determine the cost of any damage to properties and farming livestock to find creative solutions to mitigate these situations
  • Incentivising communities by adding value through tourism – offering training to enable them to find employment within the wildlife tourism industry.

Despite the impact on supply chains due to Covid-19 restrictions and subsequent lockdowns, the necessary materials were procured and 20 residents (15 men and 5 women) were nominated to help with the construction, this included:

  • Sourcing fencing poles
  • Collecting and dressing the poles
  • Digging holes and cement corner posts (5), gate posts (1) and stays (12)
  • Cleaning of the fence line
  • Stringing and fastening wires
  • Closing the fence for small stock

Nearly all the countries in the world have promised to improve the planet and the lives of its citizens by 2030.

They’ve committed themselves to 17 life-changing goals, outlined by the UN in 2015. These Global Goals, also known as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), include ending extreme poverty, giving people better healthcare, and achieving equality for women.  The aim is for all countries to work together to ensure no one is left behind.

This project is aligned with the following goals: